Chronicles of life. rants of bliss

A hodgepodge of essays, music, pictures and gifs that set my heart alight. Occasional reblogs of my own writing and photos as well.
Swirl

Swirl

This is my life.
I want to laugh, but it’s too close to home

This is my life.

I want to laugh, but it’s too close to home

(Source: theonion, via wahalalife)

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

The all-white reinvention of Medieval Europe commonly depicted in popular fiction, films, tv shows and art is entirely that: a fiction. An invention. An erasure. Obviously, people of color have been an essential and integral part of European life, European art, and European literary imagination since time immemorial. To cite “historical accuracy” as a means to project whitewashed images of the past into the future to maintain a fiction of white supremacy is an unconscionable farce.

People of Color are not an anachronism.

Follow.

Ask.

Submit.

1. Don Miguel de Castro, Ambassador for the Kingdom of Kongo to Dutch Brazil (1637)

2. Xiang Fei (Fragrant Concubine), of the Uighur, in European Armor (1760)

3. Sir Morien, Black Knight of the Round Table (c. 1200s)

4. Manuel I Komnenos and his second wife Maria of Antioch (c. 1150)

5. Sancho I of Castile and Léon (c. 1129)

6. Portrait of Maria Salviati de’ Medici with Giulia de’ Medici (1537)

7. Mulay Ahmad portrait by Rubens (1609)

8. Adoration of the Magi by David (c. 1490)

9. special post about the Fayoum Mummy Portraits (c. 100 B.C.E.)

10. Miniature from a Psalter, Including a Calendar (c. 1240)

(via diasporicroots)

fotojournalismus:

“Turkana” by Jehad Nga

A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.

In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.

(via dynamicafrica)

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “When Did You Fall in Love With being an African Woman?”
When did you fall in love with the texture of your hair? The shape of your nose. The shape of your eyes.
When did you fall in love with your curves or lack thereof? When did you fall in love with the way your hips switch as you walk? The way your arms swing along to the rhythm of that switch?
When did you fall in love with the length of your legs? The size of your thighs.  The shape of your butt.
When did you fall in love with your midnight skin? With the way you glisten in orange or white.
When did you fall in love with being an African woman?
This month Rise Africa will take a moment to talk about when we fell in love with our Africanness.  The “Women in Africa and the Diaspora” series will take that question a step further and ask: when did you fall in love with being an African woman? When did you start embracing your crowning glories as an African woman? When did you stop comparing your physical features to that of a European woman?  Furthermore, how do you maintain confidence in your crowning glories when you are constantly bombarded with images that fit Eurocentric standards of beauty?
Share your thoughts, experiences, and reflections on when you fell in love with being an African woman. If you’re interested in participating in this series, I encourage you to contribute. E-mail me at bilphena@africaisdonesuffering.com for more information.
-Bilphena Yahwon

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “When Did You Fall in Love With being an African Woman?”

When did you fall in love with the texture of your hair? The shape of your nose. The shape of your eyes.

When did you fall in love with your curves or lack thereof? When did you fall in love with the way your hips switch as you walk? The way your arms swing along to the rhythm of that switch?

When did you fall in love with the length of your legs? The size of your thighs.  The shape of your butt.

When did you fall in love with your midnight skin? With the way you glisten in orange or white.

When did you fall in love with being an African woman?

This month Rise Africa will take a moment to talk about when we fell in love with our Africanness.  The “Women in Africa and the Diaspora” series will take that question a step further and ask: when did you fall in love with being an African woman? When did you start embracing your crowning glories as an African woman? When did you stop comparing your physical features to that of a European woman?  Furthermore, how do you maintain confidence in your crowning glories when you are constantly bombarded with images that fit Eurocentric standards of beauty?

Share your thoughts, experiences, and reflections on when you fell in love with being an African woman. If you’re interested in participating in this series, I encourage you to contribute. E-mail me at bilphena@africaisdonesuffering.com for more information.

-Bilphena Yahwon

(via yagazieemezi)